Redrafting the manuscript…again

A few months ago, I hired an editor to take a look at my novel. This was a big step for me, to look beyond beta readers and go for more professional advice. I took my time to find the right one and with their help, picked the right services.

Once the first step had been completed, I took some time to think about the feedback I’d been given and how I could best make the changes needed to address the points I wanted to – some were points left intentionally to work into the trilogy as a whole.

Now, I’ve finished my part of it and I’m ready to move onto the next step.

Taking some time to process things

I’m fortunate that I’m used to receiving feedback. Hell, I look forward to it. I always want to do better and improve my craft and my stories.

That’s why I was able to take the feedback on board quite quickly and start making a plan. Most of it was positive, and I decided that fewer smaller changes would do much better than a few larger ones. This meant I’d have to pay attention to smaller details and the ramifications of those throughout the manuscript but, even now it’s done, I stand by that choice.

I spent a chunk of time wondering if I’d done too much, or not enough, but in the end, I’ll see what the next phase of this process throws at me and what needs to be done next. Either way, I’ll be more aware of this going forward with the next book.

Even then, the feedback I didn’t expect didn’t knock me down too much, either. Some of it related to things I want to address in further books to make them more connected, but that doesn’t mean I can ignore it entirely here.

I can see now the benefits an expert’s eye can bring.

Dealing with distractions

As you might know by now, I tend not to stick around in one place for too long. The last year saw me stick to Wellington, with work and Covid both playing a part in that decision.

I had hoped that my last few weeks at Wellington would let me go through the manuscript and get it ready for the next service I need to have done, but as usual, life had other plans.

I managed bits and pieces but there were friends to see and say goodbye to, work to finish and packing to do. I’m the kind of person who likes to set aside time and get on with things, but given my nomadic lifestyle, I don’t want to miss out on life, either.

That means I had to take some distractions and finish the work this week, while in my current home of Queenstown. It’s been a good balance; explore, do things and write. I can’t complain at all, so far, and it’s worked out nicely, if I do say so!

Overwhelming relief

Having got it done, there’s a sense of relief.

Don’t’ get me wrong, there’s still more to do. Another round with my editor, Rachel, is coming early next year and even beyond that, there’s the work to get everything ready to self-publish. That means that while I can relax a little and take a little breather, there’s no time to let up.

Not only that, but books two and three are looming. Their first drafts are done but I don’t want those redrafts to take as long as this one has.

Even with my travelling, I’m going to have to get better at managing my time.

But for now, I’ve got another project that demands my attention.

Bursting the comfort bubble; hiring an editor

While working on my novel, I’ve been fortunate enough to have met a number of people who offered to read and provide feedback on it over the last few years. I could try and list them, but I’d probably forget some – such has been the collective effort – but every contribution has allowed it to evolve.

That’s in addition to my own learning and growth, and these are lessons and comments I’ve taken to heart in every draft and project since. There comes a point, though, where something else is needed.

There have been questions and comments, but they’ve been of a similar vein. This is incredibly helpful, as it tells me I’m on the right path and I can address some of the gaps and problems. The number decreased with each draft, and it left me feeling quite confident.

While submitting to agents hasn’t been the success I’d hoped for, that’s not surprising. Maybe it’s the genre, or the niche within the genre? Maybe my cover letter hasn’t gripped them, or perhaps it’s just not good enough to be published?

Except, I don’t believe that last one. I can’t.

Why did I hire an editor?

So, while making moves towards self-publishing, I wanted to make sure that this is as good as can be. For that, I needed something else; a fresh pair of eyes trained to spot the things I still didn’t see. There are different services to choose from, and I spent some time speaking to different people and professionals to find the right path for me.

And then I found the right one.

It turned out, after all those conversations, the right one for me was someone I knew! Rachel has been a friend for a fair few years now, and it turned out that some of her clients had provided her with the kind of experience I wanted and needed.

After discussing my situation and needs, a course of action was set. The cost fit into my expectations and the excitement soared as everything was agreed, signed and started.

The hardest part of it all was waiting for the assessment to come back to me, or so I thought.

Dealing with a new kind of feedback

I’m used to friends reading my work. I’m used to relative strangers reading my work. I’m used to classmates reading my work.

I want the honest feedback. I’ll fight my corner but, ultimately, if something doesn’t become clear when I intended it to for a reader without the knowledge I have, that’s got to be addressed. Some of it is genre or style, and different readers pick up on different things, so having a wide net to cast is really useful.

An editor’s comments are something else.

There is literally no reason to be shy or protect my feelings. I’ve paid for a service, so I expect professional results. I got those, but it still hit me more than I expected. That’s another lesson to learn.

There weren’t any negative comments, though. Everything was constructive and questioning. A lot of it was designed to make me ask the questions and find the answers myself, and that takes time. I have some consultation time included but rather than rush in, I’m thinking on the points raised, looking over my manuscript and making notes that I can formulate later into questions.

Again, I’ve paid for this and I’ve got to be professional, too – that’ll help me get the most out of this whole experience. Anything I can learn now will only help me in the future. I’ll take my medicine and do my best to do better in the future.

The results

First of all, it’s made me rethink more than a few things about the story. It proved to be a bit of a wakeup call, and that’s a good way to beat the complacency that can set in. While the test readers had responded positively, there’s always a niggling doubt that they’re trying to protect your feelings somewhat, even the ones who are casual friends or passing acquaintances.

Some of the comments I received, now that I processed them, are on the mark, and the next draft will take big steps to address them. Some need subtle changes and others bigger, more sweeping edits throughout various parts of the manuscript.

Ultimately, the decision of what to change falls to me. This isn’t a traditional publishing deal where I have to make certain changes (if that’s how it works), and I need to keep in mind that the editor has studied this story in relation to itself, while I have two sequels in first draft. Some of the points raised I can relate directly to how I’ve structured the trilogy as a whole rather than just a standalone book. This is something I’ll discuss with her further.

Once done, I can move on to the more technical editing – and that takes me another step closer to the publishing stage.

It’s starting to feel a little more real.

Surviving lockdown and self-isolation

The last seven weeks have been incredibly difficult for people around the world. The emergence of Covid-19, it’s fast spread and devastating effect on people, countries and economies are well-documented.

Different approaches have been adopted by everyone, from world leaders to families, and it’s clear the effects they have.

On a personal level, though, I spent the start of lockdown (here in New Zealand) wondering what to do. I was fortunate to be able to continue working – although I’m not going to lie, I was a bit envious of those who had some free time to do things – but if I was going to be stuck inside for however many weeks, I wanted to do some, to achieve something.

The goals of lockdown

First of all, getting through lockdown is the goal. I’m aware it’s ended here (for now, at least) but others around the world are in a different situation. Before reading any further, I want to stress to you that I took this approach because it’s what was best for me.

If the best thing for you is to binge Netflix, spend time with the family, sleep a lot, go to work, learn a new language or any other idea – then do that. Sure, try something new but no one has the right to take aim at how you get through this. We should be supporting each other, and I’m glad I had friends who gave me the support I needed to get through lockdown in my own way.

So, I set two goals. The first was to work on my current novel-length project. I had started in January 2020, and while that month had been busy with a new job, February and March proved more productive. I was about two-thirds of the way through when lockdown started, and I hoped to get another third done.

The second goal was to start working on the content for Innate Wanderings since it’s little reboot. I’d stopped the updates due to the global situation, but there’s a lot I want to cover over there.

Completing the project

Of these two goals, I completed one – and then some. Even while working full-time, I worked to get three chapters a week done, and after the first four weeks of lockdown, I had met the original target. I could have stopped there, or reduced how much work I did on it to meet my other goal, but I felt like I was on a role.

Over the next three weeks (and if I’m being truthful, the first few days after lockdown ended, too), I finished the first draft of the project. Is it perfect? Not at all, but it’s a good foundation to start from as the editing process begins later this year. It’s a bigger achievement than I expected to have by this point in the year – the original plan was to finish this draft in the last quarter of 2020 – and it’s given me a huge sense of satisfaction.

Having this goal made lockdown and self-isolation easier. Without the distractions of life, it felt like a good use of time and stopped me focusing or dwelling on the negatives the situation brought.

As a result, the content for Innate Wanderings didn’t come to fruition but there’s time for that later.

So, what next?

Well, as is my custom, I’ll take a bit of a break from writing. I had other plans, and I may dip into them after a while but whether it’s more blogging or short stories, I’m not sure yet.

With lockdown coming to an end in New Zealand, I’ll have time to do some exploring again. There’s a lot to see, and an economy to support. We’re coming into winter, so there are time and weather restrictions to figure out. On top of that, I have friends to see and a couple of games I neglected over the last couple of months.

That means plenty of things to keep me occupied while I’m taking this break and letting my mind recover.

Until then, my friends. Take care!

The rollercoaster of 2020, and what’s coming next

Hello! Hi! Hey! Hiya!

I’m still here, but as I mentioned last time out (last year, geez) I needed a break. I finished the first draft of the second book of my current trilogy project, and it got a little intense towards the end as I pushed to get it done amongst two jobs.

It got a bit too much and while I wanted to do more short stories and other projects in the meantime, changes in location, lifestyle, working commitments and more made that a bit harder. In short, in November, I packed up and said goodbye to Australia (temporarily, I hope) and started a new adventure in New Zealand.

It’s been five months since then, the job I came for started well but a better opportunity came up that will keep me here until November, so I can enjoy a bit more of a stable life outside of a hostel. It’s meant a lot of change, and whenever I get used to a situation it changes!

That being said, since 2020 began, I’ve managed to dive headfirst into book number three, so that’s positive.

Picking up the pen (figuratively speaking)

I’ve harked on about this time off since finishing the first draft of book two for a while now, and normally I wouldn’t take so long away from writing but I’m also not one to force something that isn’t ready to be done.

In an ideal world, I’d be able to work on projects every day, but jobs take priority, and I like to go on adventures, too. Balancing that is a challenge but one I’ve got better at handling now that things have become a bit more regular.

I’ve also set myself a more realistic goal. I aim for one chapter a week. That means progress will be slow, but I’ll still get to enjoy my time in New Zealand and work/writing won’t suffer. In some cases, I’ll do more when it strikes but this is definitely doable.

Covid-19, holidays and isolation

As we’re all aware, Covid-19 has thrown us into turmoil so far in 2020. It’s a big issue and I was lucky to get back from a two-and-a-half-week holiday in Southeast Asia just before things go worse. I was in self isolation from the office, got three days back and then started to work from home again before a four-week national lockdown began.

I’ll still be working but I also can’t go anywhere. This means I have a chance to get more work done on my book than I thought.

January was a slow month, but February proved much more productive even with this great holiday I enjoyed! March has been a little bit of catching up but I’m almost back to my target just in time for the end of the month.

I’m hoping to get at least two chapters done a week during this isolation period, which will speed things up immensely – and if it goes on longer, then I can get even more done.

I’m trying to stay positive, you see!

Getting through the lock-down

And here we are. In lock down.

Well, I am. I know many other countries are, too, but plenty are not. Wherever you are, I implore you to be safe and keep the vulnerable in mind in whatever you do.

I’ve been thinking of ways to get through this. I have a book to write but other ideas and tasks can mix things up a bit, keep it fresh and interesting. The idea I have is to collate some of the writing tasks I’ve found and use(d) over the years and post them here.

Writing isn’t for everyone, I know, but it’s something that someone, somewhere, might find useful and that makes it worthwhile. This will start next week and if you have any ideas, please get in touch to let me know and I’ll do my best to fit them in.

Until next week, folks, keep safe!

Taking a little break

So, I’ve been a little quiet on the writing front recently. Some of you may have seen that I finished the second draft of my second book, and I felt so relieved that it was done, as at times it felt like a real slog, that I realised I needed a break.

Most of you will know that I’m doing a lot of travelling right now (and if you don’t, feel free to take a look at what I’ve been up to) and this creates some challenging environments and situations in which to focus on writing. That being said, there are plenty of positives, too.

While I tried to keep everything together, and balance the travel, work and different living scenarios, it proved really taxing. That meant that when the draft was done, I was nowhere near ready to do anything else for a while.

Normally, I’ll blog more or work on some short stories, but I couldn’t even face doing those activities, too – despite how much I love writing!

A couple of months later and I’m back to it, so there’s some catching up to do on my regular updates but also a lot of short stories I want to redraft as well as some new ideas to put into writing. I know already what I want to do for the third book of this trilogy and I’m going to start the first draft of that story in January.

Compared to the first book, which I completed fully before starting the second, this is also a little bit of an experiment for me. It will keep the world and characters I’ve created fresh in my mind but in a different part of their story. I’m hoping that when I come back to edit the second book, it’ll be easier to keep track of everything, fixing mistakes and refining the novel without as much back and forth and fact checking. I have a lot of notes, but things do change during the process.

The other reason for doing things this way revolves around my longer plan. I’ve been submitting the first book to agents since late 2017 and I’ve had no luck so far. That’s a shame but I’m not prepared to give up on it, yet. All the reader feedback I’ve had (select friends and some strangers I’ve met on during the travels – not all of which are science fiction fans) has been constructive and positive.

Most of the questions they’ve raised are points I wanted them to pick up on, the story and writing style are enjoyable and the characters interesting. This is enough to keep me pushing ahead with it. If at the end, I have no luck, I’ll consider self-publishing the first book once the first draft of book three is done. Then I can edit book two while pushing that, before editing book three while getting the second book out there.

There is a plan, and while it’s not going as I’d hoped right now, it’s good to have some goals. Over the next couple of months, I’ll have some new stories to send out and post, so you’ll see more of what I’m working on, too.

That’s it for now, ‘till next time!

I didn’t write last week…

…Except, I did.

When I’m working on a novel or similarly lengthy project, I set myself a target. It used to be 1,000 words a night back when I had one job and a stable lifestyle. I didn’t always meet it, but I did get some writing done every day, no matter how little.

With my current lifestyle, where I work three jobs and don’t have my own space, I set myself a different target; to write four chapters a week. I rarely meet it but usually I can get three done a week without too much trouble.

This week, I didn’t write a single word.

Except, I did.

I write five days a week in my current job. So, in reality, I actually wrote a lot. Writing I have to do to get paid. I need that money to live and continue my travels later one.

But, when it comes to my own project, I wrote nothing.

Instead, I worked my second job on four of those days and nights, after my main job (which is a 9-5). Again, there are benefits to this, but I didn’t write anything.

And I feel guilty.

I’m close to finishing the first draft of this project, and my goal is to get it done this month. That should still be doable, I hope. Not writing for a week is just going to mean I have to do more in a shorter time.

This is what I want for my future, and I feel bad that I’ve been so lax. I can’t even say I did anything exciting or had a good time. Don’t get me wrong, the people I work with in my second job are great but it’s not the same. I have no stories to tell, no pictures to show and no writing to mark that passage of time.

I didn’t write last week.

I feel guilty every time I let an opportunity pass me by. Sometimes I am too busy, others I know I’m not in the right frame of mind to do so. I still feel guilty. I’m trying to change that, to accept the decisions I make in my life, for whatever reason, are the best they can be in that moment. Maybe things would be different if I took those chances, but maybe not. There’s no way to know for sure.

I’m getting better. This has become a bit of a mantra for me, one I wanted to share. It’s okay that, as a writer, there are times I don’t write. It’s okay there are others I do. It’s okay to enjoy other things or prioritise other parts of my life.

I’m not there yet, but I’m improving every day. Every week.

I did no writing last week, except, I did. Then again, I also didn’t.

And that’s okay.

Keeping myself motivated

It can be hard writing all the time when things are so unstable. I know some people who love that uncertainty, and to a point I do, too. However, I do like a little stability. I like to know I’ve got a job or can get one. I like to know I’ve got money to keep a roof over me and food on my plate. There have been times during this adventure when those things haven’t been so certain and it’s then I find it hard to sit down and write.

I spend too much time thinking about things that aren’t writing. Life problems, you might say, in a sense.

Of course, everything is a wave. There are highs and lows. Now that I’m on a rise, I can think clearly and put everything in perspective.

Sure, I can write a blog post or a short story at random times but for a larger project, like the novel I’m working on now, I like a bit of a stability. Which leads me to…

Getting into a routine

One thing I learned at university was a routine. If I could write at roughly the same time of day (or night) each day then it’d be easier for me to get into the flow and get more done. That has worked for me in the past, but I do like having a set space to work from, which isn’t easy when travelling.

When you get regular hours at a job, then it becomes easier to get that routine going. It might be worth writing at the same time even if those times vary through the week. It’s training your mind to know when it’s time to be creative and work, and that 9-5 mentality is exactly the same.

Seeing other people’s success

This is a double-edged sword but when you see friends and colleagues doing well, you feel happy and want to support them however you can.

Then comes the jealousy.

It’s not that they’re better than you, but they have something of market value then. That just means you have to think about your ideas and what’s out there now. It also means you need to keep trying. Don’t compare their journey to your own, just focus on doing what you do best and do it well. One day, it’ll come to you.

Yes, I’m also telling myself that. We all need to hear it at times.

The occasional pep talk

I’m grateful for the friends I’ve got who keep me going when things look hopeless. A lot of these are writers in similar situations to myself, and I’m more than happy to return the favour. We’re all still young in the grand scheme of things and it’s nice to get a little bit of encouragement amongst all the rejection we get from publishers and agents.

The same rings true for life in general, and those uplifting feelings can transfer to other areas when we need them most. If you know a creative and they’re a bit down, give them some encouragement and offer some criticism to help. You might not be an expert, but you can appreciate it. Let them explain some of their craft to you, let them feel like their skills and knowledge is valuable.

Again, the same is true in life. Look out for people who could use a little lift. Good things can be passed on really easily.

Looking back to how far I’ve come

It may sound a little cliché but it’s great to look back at where I’ve come from – in terms of my journey as a writer. I look back at the projects I’ve completed and remember thinking that I’d never be able to finish it.

These aren’t masterpieces by any means but compared to my writing now, I can see how I’ve changed, how my style has grown, and it makes me proud. I look forward to pushing on and seeing where I’ll be in the future.

Of course, hopefully that involve a published book or two (or ten, maybe more) but the more I travel, the more I learn about myself and there are always things to do and learn. Maybe it’s not what’ll happen but until I know for sure, I’m going to keep trying.

You should, too, whatever your goals may be.

Writer Problems: A Not So Comprehensive List

We all have problems. Some are serious, some not so much. How big or problematic they are depends on our view at the time and with the passage of time, they seem to get smaller until we wonder why it bothered us in the first place.

That being said, some are more annoying than anything. They can be ironically funny, blindingly frustrating, facepalm cringeworthy or many other colour adjectives. Writers are no different. So, here is a list of writer problems. It’s not extensive or comprehensive but they’re all problems I’ve encountered (and not always solved) as well as those of other writers I’ve met and spoken to.

Hell, they probably apply to many creatives and professions – but you’ll have to tell me that.

Pets like getting involved

Not much to say about this one but any writer with pets will know exactly what I’m talking about – our lovable companions just KNOW we need their help.

My dog 'helping' me work
My dog ‘helping’ me work

I can’t deny it’s true at times, but when I’m on a roll and my dog decides to jump on me or my laptop, that’s more hindering than helping. Still, wouldn’t trade her for the world.

Feeling guilty over a lack of productiveness

I don't work right up here gif
Something’s wrong with my head, I think

I’m starting with one of my favourites. I like to take a break between big projects and drafts. It helps me put some distance between what I’ve just done and what I’m going to do next. It can be a week, a month or even a year – it really depends on the project and how drained I feel.

So, FREE TIME! That’s what I tell myself. I’ll catch up on my favourite TV shows, go to some gigs, tick off a few books in the ‘to read’ pile and get some gaming done. Actually, no. Very little happens because I feel guilty about not writing or editing! So, I find other work to do, whether it’s planning something new – or related – to the current project, doing some redrafting etc. It’s great but everything else listed above, well those piles, lists and such get bigger. Who knows when I’m going to get around to them?

Oh well, I keep up with Facebook…

The anticipation of feedback

I like to think that I’m pretty patient while waiting for feedback. I do understand that people are busy and have their own lives and things to sort. That’s what I tell myself and hope it conveys that way to others.

I just have a lot of feelings gif
WHY WON’T YOU LOVE ME?

However, on the inside I’m screaming ‘READ THE BOOK AND TELL ME WHAT YOU THINK!’ every day until I get it back. Sometimes I can’t wait and I break my rule and ask. I feel guilty about that too. Thankfully, my writer friends understand that…I think…I hope!

The infamous writers block

I got nothing gif
I relate to this way too much

I could write 1,500 essays on this subject. It. Is. So. Annoying. And frustrating. And has a particularly awful sense of timing. Countless are the times I’ve been on a great role and the one day it just stops. And I end up staring at a blank screen four hours searching for a particular word or phrase.

Sometimes a film, a show, a song, a book, a game, a word or accident can snap me out of it. Other times, I need a good sleep or swim to clear the head. Other times, I think it’s a way for the mind to tell us to take a break. Maybe to organise our thoughts or think about a problem – or just give us a rest. We’re not machines, we do need it every so often.

Knowing what you want to say without having the right words

Use your words gif
How I feel with my mind when it blocks me

Sort of related to the last point but how many times have you had the PERFECT idea for that scene or chapter that’s been bugging you for weeks but when you come to put it on paper or screen, you stall. It’s not a block because you know exactly what you want to say but it just won’t come out. Damnit.

This is a fantastic example of why redrafting is so key. I’m all about the flow of my work and stories but sometimes you’ve got to force past it and just get it on paper. The editing lets you find those parts and smooth them out to match the rest of the story. That doesn’t stop me from wanting to tear someone’s arms off when it happens, though.

Not being able to stop the inner monologue

Maybe this is just me, but sometimes I wish I could switch my brain off. A CTRL+ALT+DEL function would be amazing. Simply amazing. Someone do this and I will love you forever.

Facepalm gif
There are never enough facepalms for this

I find this more when I’ve been writing for a while or working for a long time on a project; I just can’t stop. I know I’ve got work in the morning or an early start for whatever reason – or I’m supposed to be meeting friends or family or whatever – so I stop writing but that monologue is just going on and on.

The worst part is, whether I cave and get up or return to it the next day, the ideas are gone. Potential writing gold gone for good. That’s when the facepalm strikes.

The conflict of how to tell people what you do

All is good, you’re at an event, seeing some friends and there’s new people around. You strike a conversation and then they ask you one of the worst questions ever; ‘what do you do?’

Why is life so hard gif
Sometimes this is easier than changing words on a computer…

Where to even start with this? I write words and hope it’ll make me money is one option. I tell stories sounds childish. A writer sounds hipster and clichéd. Aspiring writer makes it seem like you’re trying too hard. Author? Not a chance, not till I’m published. Usually, I tell people I’m working on a book. They’ll either be interested and ask more or they won’t. It’s a safe option but why is it so hard?!

Not knowing when to stop

This is another favourite of mine. How do you know when it’s finished? The amount of times I’ve done the final draft of something only to come back in six months and let my inner voice yell ‘WHAT THE HELL WERE YOU THINKING, THINKING THAT WAS DONE?’ until I cave in and do another draft.

I’m not always convinced the new draft is better. Surely there’s a point where what you started with or tried to achieve has been lost through so many edits you have something new completely. Is it still one story or is it two? If I find an answer, I’ll let you know.

Getting published!

Cats headbutting each other gif
It’s not a brick wall but very cute…and painful

I saved the biggest problem for last. It is one of THE biggest hurdles any writer who wants to make a career out of putting words on paper can and will face – unless you’re incredibly lucky. If you are, don’t forget about this blogger/writer/Scot.

I’ve not explored this much compared to others but even what I’ve experienced I can liken to headbutting a brick wall over and over and over and over. And over. Repeat until brain becomes mush. Hunting down and acquiring an agent is much the same. And yes, I’ve headbutted a brick wall (a lot as a child and once recently to test out this experiment. It hurt. A lot) so take my word for it.

Any other big writer problems I’ve missed? Let me know!

Return of the Writer

Once again, ladies and gents, you have my apologies. I had hoped to get back into the swing of things long before now but the book took a lot more out of me than I first thought. I really needed some time to recover – mentally more than anything – and to be able to look at all three books with a fresh mind.

Now, I feel like I’m finally at that stage. Oh, and I like puns. You should know this by now (and in case you didn’t get it – shame on you – that’s a Star Wars reference at the top. Can’t believe I explained that).

I’ve not been sitting idly by, however. Some things have been going on. So, my friends, join me on what, I’m sure you’ll agree, is a riveting tale. Maybe. Possibly. Okay, probably not but bear with me.

Where have I been?

I’ve been here and there, keeping busy without exhausting myself further. Or trying not to. I tried reading but that was a little too close to home and I found that even gaming wasn’t as appealing as I’d thought it would be. I did keep up with swimming, other than last week where I had other exercise plans (dodgeball – don’t ask but I do have a medal!). Hell, I even tried quitting smoking.

The one thing that is worth noting is that over the last couple of weeks is that it was the fifth Manchester Children’s Book Festival. I’ve volunteered at every single one to date and this year was no exception, although following the pattern of the previous two, I’m not as involved as previously but that doesn’t stop me enjoying it all the same.

It’s fantastic to see so many children getting involved with reading, writing, performances and much more – anything creative and wacky! It’s been a pleasure to see the festival grow since 2010 and I’m looking forward to next year already.

Expect a more detailed post on this in two weeks. I wouldn’t want to break tradition now, would I?

Finding motivation

One thing that I think has been really lacking for me is motivation. Since finishing the first draft of the most recent novel, I’ve been finding it hard to come back – for whatever reason. Life can work for or against us and we subconsciously associate that with actions, activities, emotions and such. I think when I’m not happy with something big in my life, it stops me from wanting to write as I feel that should be fixed first.

It doesn’t apply all the time but it does have an impact.

I also had a conversation with a friend about writer’s block, which I’m still not convinced actually exists as a thing but yet I’ve yet to encounter a writer who hasn’t used this term when they struggle. That seems to be more to do with ease – we all understand it, from varying sources – so it doesn’t need explanation. Despite that, why is it a thing and is it only a thing because we make it so? I don’t think I’ve had writer’s block as I write at work and generally. Hey, I’m writing a blog post right now! It’s an interesting thought, though.

Actually, I think this is a topic for a full blog post next month. Look out for that!

Putting together a plan

My manuscripts: one novella and two novels - not related to each other
My manuscripts: one novella and two novels – not related to each other

As I mentioned in a previous post, I have three projects to edit. The novella is first up, and I’ll be starting that at the weekend. I like it’s length but the ‘professional’ feedback (from agents and publishers) suggest it would work better as a novel. I’ll decide that as I go through the draft but I’m not convinced yet. There are other things that need to be fixed, however.

After that, I’ll start on one of the novels. The sci-fi project is up first, as it’s more recent and I think it needs less work. The story is well rounded, it just needs to be padded out in places, with a few more explanations and sub plots, supported by a little character development. That might sound a lot, but it won’t be as bad as you might think. Of course, after that comes the nit-picking of later drafts.

Finally, I’ll work on the fantasy novel. That needs a fair bit adding to it for me to be happy. The good thing is, I know what to add, the big question is where it should go. I have some ideas but the edit will help identify weaker areas and the plot holes that I know exist.

If I can get all that done over summer, I MIGHT just have one ready to send out by the end of the year.

If I’m lucky.

It’s time to…edit!

I hoped to post this last week but, according to my schedule, there are still two weeks until the next post so I’m safe (the glory of a five-week month) for now. I teased previously about why I’ve been so quiet lately, with a lot of things on the go and now I’m finally ready to show you what I’ve been working on.

So, here are my three babies manuscripts. Aren’t they pretty…?

My manuscripts: one novella and two novels - not related to each other
My manuscripts: one novella and two novels – not related to each other

What are they?

From left to right, there’s a novella in third draft, a novel in first draft and another novel in first draft (yes, that’s a long way of saying it but I’m enjoying my words. Hush). I feel like it shouldn’t have taken this long to get this far but then I remembered life easily gets in the way. That’s a whole different topic.

I hope they’re all published one day, obviously, but I’m proud of reaching this stage. I’ve covered fiction, fantasy and science fiction (in that order, respectively) so not completely in my comfort zone but trying something new is always harder than anything else. Maybe that’s why it’s only a novella right now, but who knows what could happen.

If you want to read them – tough! They’re not ready yet but when I’m looking for readers, I’ll let you know.

What’s next?

Editing! The novels are only in first draft and need a fair bit of work. There are plenty of inaccuracies and continuity errors – and that’s not counting the grammatical issues. Who said writing was easy? Then again, I like a challenge. I’ll distract myself with redrafting some short stories in between as there are plenty of competitions to enter. When I find them, I’ll put them up here as normal.

Blogging resumes as normal (I promise) in two weeks. Updates on the editing will come as and when there is something to report. Until next time!